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A Bright Light

29. Bio Laboratory Scientist. Chemistry, sciences, cats, baking, cooking and making candy.
Jul 18 '14

(Source: maryrevisited)

Jul 12 '14
Jul 5 '14

(Source: pagaya)

Jul 3 '14

humanoidhistory:

Victorian microscope slides.

(A Cabinet of Curiosities)

Waaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaant!

Jun 30 '14
femmerenaissance:

Vera Rubin (b. 1928)

When Vera Cooper Rubin told her high school physics teacher that she’d been accepted to Vassar, he said, “That’s great. As long as you stay away from science, it should be okay.”
Rubin graduated Phi Beta Kappa in 1948, the only astronomy major in her class at Vassar, and went on to receive her master’s from Cornell in 1950 (after being turned away by Princeton because they did not allow women in their astronomy program) and her Ph.D. from Georgetown in 1954. Now a senior researcher at the Carnegie Institute’s Department of Terrestrial Magnetism, Rubin is credited with proving the existence of “dark matter,” or nonluminous mass, and forever altering our notions of the universe. She did so by gathering irrefutable evidence to persuade the astronomical community that galaxies spin at a faster speed than Newton’s Universal Law of Gravitation allows. As a result of this finding, astronomers conceded that the universe must be filled with more material than they can see. 
Rubin made a name for herself not only as an astronomer but also as a woman pioneer; she fought through severe criticisms of her work to eventually be elected to the National Academy of Sciences (at the time, only three women astronomers were members) and to win the highest American award in science, the National Medal of Science. Her master’s thesis, presented to a 1950 meeting of the American Astronomical Society, met with severe criticism, and her doctoral thesis was essentially ignored, though her conclusions were later validated. “Fame is fleeting,” Rubin said when she was elected to the National Academy of Sciences. “My numbers mean more to me than my name. If astronomers are still using my data years from now, that’s my greatest compliment.”


 Sources:
1. http://innovators.vassar.edu/innovator.html?id=68; http://science.vassar.edu/women/
2. http://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/45424

femmerenaissance:

Vera Rubin (b. 1928)


When Vera Cooper Rubin told her high school physics teacher that she’d been accepted to Vassar, he said, “That’s great. As long as you stay away from science, it should be okay.”

Rubin graduated Phi Beta Kappa in 1948, the only astronomy major in her class at Vassar, and went on to receive her master’s from Cornell in 1950 (after being turned away by Princeton because they did not allow women in their astronomy program) and her Ph.D. from Georgetown in 1954. Now a senior researcher at the Carnegie Institute’s Department of Terrestrial Magnetism, Rubin is credited with proving the existence of “dark matter,” or nonluminous mass, and forever altering our notions of the universe. She did so by gathering irrefutable evidence to persuade the astronomical community that galaxies spin at a faster speed than Newton’s Universal Law of Gravitation allows. As a result of this finding, astronomers conceded that the universe must be filled with more material than they can see. 

Rubin made a name for herself not only as an astronomer but also as a woman pioneer; she fought through severe criticisms of her work to eventually be elected to the National Academy of Sciences (at the time, only three women astronomers were members) and to win the highest American award in science, the National Medal of Science. Her master’s thesis, presented to a 1950 meeting of the American Astronomical Society, met with severe criticism, and her doctoral thesis was essentially ignored, though her conclusions were later validated. “Fame is fleeting,” Rubin said when she was elected to the National Academy of Sciences. “My numbers mean more to me than my name. If astronomers are still using my data years from now, that’s my greatest compliment.”

 Sources:

1. http://innovators.vassar.edu/innovator.html?id=68; http://science.vassar.edu/women/

2. http://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/45424

Jun 30 '14

Howl’s Moving Castle Replica

Howl’s Moving Castle Replica

Jun 29 '14

(Source: caalef)

Jun 25 '14

when you are forced to take classes that have nothing to do with science

medschoolapplicant:

image

Jun 23 '14

modhero:

Quirky miniature porcelain sculptures made by Ukranian artists  website Anya Stasenko and Slava Leontyev

(Source: asylum-art)

Jun 14 '14

Animal Crossing Birthday Cake - Video [ LINK ]

(Source: rosannapansino)

Jun 13 '14
Jun 13 '14
Jun 6 '14

cluelessmedic:

Measles - Subacute Sclerosing Pancencephalitis

  • a rare and fatal late complication of measles infection
  • due to an immune reaction to the virus, causing inflammation, swelling of the brain, it is always fatal
  • it may appear years after apparent recovery 
  • rarely seen now in countries with vaccination programmes 

Ya see….. All these people on the non-vaccination band wagon: You choose this over a bogus idea of your child “attracting” a mental illness from vaccines? You need to get your priorities reevaluated. 

May 23 '14
May 17 '14
justinejoli:

the-actual-universe:

SPRINGY COLORS FOR SATURN
Many of us in the Northern hemisphere are enjoying sunny spring weather and all the bursts of color that come along with it, but this bright palette comes to us from another world. 
Captured by Cassini’s Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph, or UVIS, the view shows portions of the C and B rings, from left to right. The ultraviolet images captured by UVIS don’t just look pretty; they tell us something about the composition of the rings. The water ice that makes up the rings has widely varying degrees of purity. A pure turquoise color implies the purest ice, while the level of reddish hue indicates more contaminants.
Saturn’s stunning looks often make it a fan favorite, and eager stargazers will have an excellent opportunity to spot it this month. Even those with the smallest telescopes can turn their eye toward the constellation Libra, where the ringed planet will be visible along with a handful of its brightest moons. A suggested magnification of 100 - 150 times will provide the optimum view for anyone interested in seeing the planet. 
Image:  NASA/JPL/University of ColoradoSources: 1, 2

Our universe is awesome

justinejoli:

the-actual-universe:

SPRINGY COLORS FOR SATURN

Many of us in the Northern hemisphere are enjoying sunny spring weather and all the bursts of color that come along with it, but this bright palette comes to us from another world. 

Captured by Cassini’s Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph, or UVIS, the view shows portions of the C and B rings, from left to right. The ultraviolet images captured by UVIS don’t just look pretty; they tell us something about the composition of the rings. The water ice that makes up the rings has widely varying degrees of purity. A pure turquoise color implies the purest ice, while the level of reddish hue indicates more contaminants.

Saturn’s stunning looks often make it a fan favorite, and eager stargazers will have an excellent opportunity to spot it this month. Even those with the smallest telescopes can turn their eye toward the constellation Libra, where the ringed planet will be visible along with a handful of its brightest moons. A suggested magnification of 100 - 150 times will provide the optimum view for anyone interested in seeing the planet. 

Image:  NASA/JPL/University of Colorado
Sources: 1, 2

Our universe is awesome